Talk Like a Native
Episode 10 - The grass is always greener on the other side

Episode 10 - The grass is always greener on the other side

July 10, 2016

Talk Like a Native

Episode 10 : “The grass is always greener on the other side (of the fence)”

Christine: Why the long face* Kevin?

Kevin: I’m feeling a little depressed about my life. I was just browsing on Facebook and it seems that all of my friends have gotten married and have kids already.

Christine: First of all, Facebook is not a gauge of how happy people are. Secondly, contrary to popular belief*, marriage is not the answer to all of your problems. Trust me on this when I say the grass is always greener on the other side of the fence.

Kevin: What do you mean?

Christine: I mean that single people look at married people and might feel that their life is better. They feel like maybe their life would be more complete if they were married. It’s like looking over at your neighbor’s lawn and thinking that their grass looks healthier and greener when in reality it just seems that way from your perspective.

Kevin: So are you saying married people feel the same way?

Christine: Of course! Married people might look at single people and wish that they had more time to do the things that they wanted to do. They might envy the freedom to go out and not have to answer to someone when they come home. There’s positive and negative aspects to both sides.

Kevin: Wow, I’ve honestly never looked at it that way. I guess you’re right when you say the grass is always greener on the other side. Let’s help our listeners get a better understanding too!

  • Stacy: My job is so tedious. I wish I had my own business, like John does.

Steve: John probably wishes he had the financial security of earning a stable salary. Trust me, the grass is always greener on the other side of the fence.

  • Jean: I’m so jealous you just got your Master’s. I’ve always wanted to do it, but I could never find the time or the money.
    Scott: Well, the grass ain’t so green on my side you know. You’re forgetting the fact that now I’m about 100,000 dollars in debt and I still can’t seem to find a decent job.

  • Cecilia: Now that you’re married, it must be so nice to have someone to go home to every day.
    Justin: Yeah, except now it’s like having my mom nag me about when I should come home. Enjoy the single life as long as possible because the grass is always greener on the other side.

Kevin: I’ll try to look for more positive things in my life instead of being jealous of other people.

Christine: That’s a great idea Kevin. How about we work on making the podcast better instead of looking at Facebook?

Kevin: Okay, mom!!

*Why the long face? - Why do you look so sad?
*Contrary to popular belief - something that you say before you make a statement that is the opposite of what most people believe

Episode 9 - Tip of the Iceberg

Episode 9 - Tip of the Iceberg

July 3, 2016

Episode 9: “Tip of the iceberg”


Kevin: It looks everything is almost done. When will the website go up?

Christine: Well, we’ve only just registered the company. This is only the tip of the iceberg.

Kevin: Tip of the iceberg? Are you talking about global warming or something?

Christine: No, no. I’m saying that we’ve only just started it and there’s a lot more to do. Like if you see an iceberg from the surface, all you see is the tip. You can’t see how deep the rest of it is.

Kevin: Oh, you mean there’s a lot more work to do!

Christine: Yeah, we’re not going to be the next Facebook. People have a very romanticised view of start-ups. They think they’re going to be the next overnight sensation, like Uber or AirBnB.

Kevin: They only see the tip of the iceberg.


Christine: Exactly! They only see what the results are and not all of the work that has gone into it.

Kevin: Let’s hear some more examples of today’s phrase.

- The damage that you see is only the tip of the iceberg. They haven’t even finished counting the money that was stolen yet.

- This is just the tip of the iceberg. There is so much money to earn in this industry, you just have to learn how to play the game.

- Laying off workers is just the tip of the iceberg. I hear that they will file for bankruptcy soon.


Kevin: We are now 9 episodes into our podcast and working hard to get you even more content soon.

Christine: Yeah guys, this is just the tip of the iceberg. We hope that you will stick around* for even more fun and exciting expressions on Talk Like a Native.

*To stick around - To remain in or near a place.

Episode 8 - Throw caution to the Wind

Episode 8 - Throw caution to the Wind

June 26, 2016

Talk Like a Native

Episode 8: “Throw caution to the wind”

Kevin: I’ve been thinking about something for a while now.

Christine: What have you been thinking about?

Kevin: Starting my own business.

Christine: Oh really? What type of business?

Kevin: I wanted to start a service to help people practice their language skills without having to memorize words or grammar rules.

Christine: Yeah, I know what you mean. A lot of people I know have their noses stuck in textbooks trying to learn languages the hard way.

Kevin: You know, what if we started a company that would help people discover the importance of actual conversation?

Christine: That sounds interesting. Oh! We could call ourselves conversationalists. We’d be professional conversation partners.

Kevin: That might work! We could create a whole community of conversationalists who can help people practice their conversation skills.

Christine: Yeah! Like a language service provider.

Kevin: I’m excited about this. Let’s throw caution to the wind and give it a shot!

Christine: Wait, what? Throw what to the wind?

Kevin: Throw caution to the wind. It means to take a chance. Imagine if all of your doubts and fears were like a piece of paper. What happens when you throw it in the wind.

Christine: Oh, it gets blown away. I get it! Let’s do it! Let’s throw caution to the wind and start our own language service.

Kevin: Before that, we should give our listeners a few more examples of today’s phrase.

- If you really like her then you should throw caution to the wind and just go talk to her.
- I decided to throw caution to the wind and quit my job to go backpacking through Europe by myself.
- You haven’t really lived until you have thrown caution to the wind for something you believed in.

Kevin: Maybe some of our listeners will even want to try out our service.

Christine: Yeah! In the meantime, we hope that they can still enjoy this podcast!

Kevin: Thanks for listening!

Episode 7 - (To be) Up in the Air

Episode 7 - (To be) Up in the Air

June 19, 2016

Talk Like a Native


Episode 7: (To be) Up in the air


Christine: Welcome back to Talk Like a Native. I’m your host Christine.

Kevin: And I’m Kevin. If you like our podcast, please consider giving us a review on iTunes. It’ll help other people find our podcast.


Christine: If you search for Talk Like a Native you should be able to find us easily on iTunes! We’ve also decided to add something we think would be helpful for our listeners to get a more natural feel of the language.

Kevin: We’re going to repeat the dialogue at a native speaker pace so you can get a better idea of what you want to work to achieve.

Christine: We hope that you will like this new addition.

Kevin: Now, let’s get down to business*. What’s our phrase for the week?


Christine: It’s up in the air.


Kevin: You mean you haven’t decided yet?

Christine: No, I mean it’s up in the air.

Kevin: That means you haven’t decided yet.

Christine: Kevin, I know what it means. What I’m saying is that our phrase for the week is “up in the air”.

Kevin: If it’s still up in the air then we need to decide quickly! Our listeners are waiting!

Christine: Kevin, listen to me. The phrase for this week is “to be up in the air”.

Kevin: Oh! You mean that the phrase is “up in the air” and not that we haven’t made a decision yet!

Christine: Now that you’ve really confused our listeners, let’s give them a clear understanding of what this phrase means.


Kevin: It means to be unsure or uncertain about something. If something is still up in the air, a decision has not been made yet.

Christine: Let’s hear some examples!


  • - Kevin: “Have you set a time for the meeting yet?” - Christine: “Things are still up in the air because Steve has a business trip on Monday.”

  • - Kevin: “Have we decided on where we’re going yet?” - Christine: “It’s still up in the air because it might rain on Sunday. I don’t want to be at the beach in the rain.”

  •          - Kevin: “Did we make the final decision on the logo yet?”  - Christine: “Sorry, it is still up in the air because Steve hasn’t looked at it yet. Once he looks at it we can make the final decision.”

Kevin: We hope that we didn’t confuse you too much!

Christine: It’s always you Kevin. If we lose listeners, I’m blaming you.

*To get down to business - to get started on the work that needs to be done

Episode 6 - Don’t count your chickens before they hatch

Episode 6 - Don’t count your chickens before they hatch

June 12, 2016

Talk Like a Native


Episode 6: “Don’t count your chickens before they hatch.”


Christine: Hey Kevin, what are you up to?


Kevin: I’m checking out how many listeners we have.


Christine: Ooh, it looks like we have at least 10.


Kevin: We’re gonna be famous!


Christine: Dude, don’t count your chickens before they hatch.


Kevin: Chickens? What chickens? I’m talking about our followers.


Christine: That’s what I’m talking about too! Don’t get your hopes up before anything happens. If you count your chickens before they hatch, you may find yourself with less than you originally expected. I think I even saw your mom as one of our subscribers.


Kevin: Of course, she’s one of our biggest fans.


Christine: Exactly, so we’re not going to be famous if only our family members listen to this. You’re getting too excited about something that hasn’t happened yet. Let me give you some other examples of this expression:


  • The results haven’t come out yet and you’ve already planned the party. You shouldn’t count your chickens before they hatch!

  • I know you have big plans for your startup, but you shouldn’t count your chickens before they hatch.

  • Don’t count your chickens before they hatch, he hasn’t even proposed yet and you’ve already bought the wedding dress.


Christine: This expression actually comes from Aesop's Fables about the milkmaid that is carrying a pail filled with milk on the top of her head.


Kevin: Oh I know this story. She daydreams about buying chickens with the money she gets from selling the milk. Then she would make money from the eggs so she could toss her head at the suitors when she’s rich.


Christine: Yup, and then she physically does that and spills the milk instead, leaving her with nothing!

Kevin: Ok, fine! I won’t count my chickens before they hatch.

Episode 5 - Going Places

Episode 5 - Going Places

June 6, 2016

Talk Like a Native

Episode 5: “To go places”

Christine: Hey, this is Christine! I am one of your hosts for Talk Like a Native.

Kevin: Just in case you guys have missed our first few episodes, we wanted to remind our listeners why we created this podcast in the first place.

Christine: So Kevin, why is it that we created this podcast in the first place?

Kevin: Well…isn’t it because English has so many weird idioms and expressions? We wanted to help people get a better understanding of them, right?

Christine: Oh yeah. It’s because these expressions can be so confusing. We wanted to simplify them for ESL learners. English can be extremely difficult at times, and we’re hoping that we can help out with some of that frustration.

Kevin: Yeah, I think this podcast will really go places.

Christine: Go places? You think like we’ll be able to like go to Europe and do our podcasts there?

Kevin: No. “Going places” means that it will be successful.

Christine: Oh man, I was getting excited at first ‘cause I thought we’d be able to go to Paris and do our podcast there. You actually just meant that Talk Like a Native will be successful?

Kevin: Yeah, but maybe if we are successful enough, we can actually go places.

Christine: Here are a few examples of how to use this expression:

  • When I first heard the idea, I knew Suda would be going places.

  • They knew that Tom, with all his talents, would definitely go places.

  • She had so much potential we all knew that she would go places.

Christine: We hope that our listeners also believe that we will be going places as well.

Kevin: Please tune in each week to hear more expressions and idioms! And remember guys, don’t memorize these phrases! Try them out and make them a natural part of your spoken English.

Episode 4 - Throw under the bus

Episode 4 - Throw under the bus

May 29, 2016

Talk Like a Native

Episode 4: Throw under the bus

Kevin: Hey Christine! How was your week?

Christine: It’s been a rough week. My colleague threw me under the bus.

Kevin: What?! Threw you under the bus? You don’t look hurt. Did you break anything? Are you ok?

Christine: Oh, I’m sorry I did not mean that literally. Throwing someone under the bus means that they put the blame on you so that they don’t get themselves in trouble.

Kevin: Ohhh I see. That really surprised me. I thought you meant that you were actually thrown in front of a moving bus.

Christine: I don’t think I would be standing here if that actually happened.

Kevin: That’s true. So what did this person do to throw you under the bus?

Christine: So we were all working on a side project* together and when my boss found out, my colleague freaked out*. She did not want to get fired so she told him that it was all my idea and I ended up taking the brunt of it*.

Kevin: I’m sorry to hear that. It really does sound like it would have been better if you were actually thrown under a bus.

Christine: Yeah that’s true. Anyways, let’s give our listeners some other examples:

  • His best friend threw him under the bus when the police questioned him about the murder.

  • My sister threw me under the bus when my mom asked who broke the vase.

  • I threw my brother under the bus when my mom was going to ground the both of us for something I didn’t even do.

Christine: Now I may have to look for another job.

Kevin: Isn’t this your other job?

Christine: You’re right. Maybe I’ll do this full-time.

Kevin: Speaking of time, we’re done for today! Hope you guys will join us again next week for more English idioms and expressions on Talk Like a Native.

*side project - something that is not work related and can be considered against company policy

* taking the brunt of it - to get a larger amount of something bad, such as blame or physical attack

* to freak out - to panic

Episode 3 - Salt in the Wound

Episode 3 - Salt in the Wound

May 22, 2016

Talk Like a Native

Episode 3: “Salt in the Wound”

Kevin: Dude... what happened to your face?

Christine: Well, I was playing basketball and one of the players on the other team tripped me.

Kevin: Ouch, did you at least win the game?

Christine: No. We lost by one point ‘cause the ref called a foul on me even though it wasn’t even my fault!

Kevin: Talk about rubbing salt in the wound!

Christine: What? That sounds painful. I wouldn’t do that! Is that some sort of home remedy?

Kevin: No. I didn’t mean literally rubbing salt in your wound. I was saying that losing is bad enough and what the ref did was like rubbing salt in your wound.

Christine: Huh?

Kevin: When I say “rub salt in your wound” I mean that someone is making a difficult situation even worse.  Not only did you get hurt, but you lost the game because of the bad call.

Christine: So you’re not telling me to put salt on my cut then?

Kevin: No, I don’t think that’s a good idea. I think it would hurt a lot.

Christine: Today’s expression is “Rub salt in your wound”. Let’s hear some examples:

  • Getting yelled at was bad enough, but having it done in front of my friends was like rubbing salt in the wound.

  • After a break up, watching people celebrate Valentine’s Day is hard enough, but having someone ask about my ex is like rubbing salt in the wound.

  • Hearing the news about her wedding was rough, but finding out she married my best friend was like having salt rubbed in the wound.

Christine: Thanks for explaining that Kevin. Now, I won’t think that people are actually telling me to put salt on my cut.

Kevin: On second thought, I think people used to do that in order to disinfect the cuts. Maybe you should try it.

Christine: No thanks.

Episode 2 - It’s so close I can almost taste it

Episode 2 - It’s so close I can almost taste it

May 16, 2016

Talk Like a Native


Episode 2: “It’s so close I can almost taste it”


Kevin: Welcome back to Episode 2 of Talk Like a Native. We hope you all had a great week.


Christine: What were you up to this week, Kevin?


Kevin: I just went shopping and met up with some friends. I’m so excited that the weather has finally warmed up. I’m really looking forward to going out this weekend and spending some time outdoors. It’s so close I can almost taste it!


Christine: Dude… it’s Monday! The weekend just ended.


Kevin: I know, but I’m just really excited that spring is finally here! The winter was way too long.


Christine: I know, right? And it was way too cold. Anyways, today’s expression is “It’s so close I can almost taste it”. Kevin, could you please explain to our listeners what this expression means?


Kevin: It means that something intangible is so close that you can almost physically feel its presence, even though it’s slightly out of reach.


Christine: It’s so close, that you feel as if it’s in front of you, and you can taste it! But unfortunately, you can’t.


Kevin: Right! What are some other examples of “It’s so close I can almost taste it”?


- “Spring is so close, I can almost taste it!”

-“I’m so close to finishing this project, I can almost taste it!”

-“Graduation is so close, I can almost taste it!”


Kevin: We hope that this has helped you get a better understanding of this phrase. Now go along and try this new expression with your friends!


Christine: Tune in next week to learn more useful phrases and expressions that you can use in your everyday life!


Kevin: Hey, did you know there’s another podcast that does something similar except everyone has cooler accents?


Christine: Oh, you mean The English We Speak?


Kevin: Yeah, I think it’s a BBC production.


Christine: It’s ok, we’re doing it the American way. We’ll be bringing you a lot more American idioms and our accents, although not as cool, are much easier to understand.

Episode 1 - Hit the Ground Running

Episode 1 - Hit the Ground Running

May 10, 2016

Talk Like a Native

Episode 1: Hit the ground running


Christine: Hi My name is Christine.

Kevin: My name is Kevin and we are your hosts for Talk like a Native.

Christine: On this program, we plan to bring you an expression a week so that you can listen to it while you commute to work or before you go to bed.

Kevin: They’re short and simple so that you can always find a little time to practice your expressions.

Christine: This is our first episode and we’re going to hit the ground running.

Kevin: That’s right folks, we’re going to charge full speed ahead*with our first expression. “Hit the ground running.”

Christine: We decided to choose this phrase to start off our podcast. Kevin, please tell everyone why we decided on this phrase.

Kevin: It means to start something immediately, work hard and be successful at it. Since this is our first episode, we thought it would be appropriate as we plan to do just that.

Christine: When I first heard this expression, I thought it meant literally to hit the ground running. I was picturing Tom Cruise jumping out of a moving vehicle and somehow managing to continue running from the bad guys.

Kevin: Mission Impossible style!

Christine: Alright, let’s hear some other examples:

-          As soon as the troops were given the signal,they hit the ground running.

-         In order to get ahead, you’ll have to hit the ground running.

-          If you want to succeed in life, you must always hit the ground running.

Christine: We hope that this has helped give you a better understanding of this phrase and remember that the point of this podcast is not to memorize the phrase but actually use it. So give it a shot**.

Kevin: Please tune in each week as we plan to provide you with many more expressions and idioms to help get you to hit the ground running so that you too can “Talk like a Native.”

*Charge full speed ahead: To try your hardest without hesitation

**Give it a shot: Give it a try; try it out